Leadership News at Cotting School

Leadership News at Cotting School

Cotting School President David Manzo Announces Retirement in 2021 Cotting School President David Manzo has announced that he will retire in September 2021, at which time he will havespent 17 years leading Cotting School as only the 6th President in Cotting’s 128-year history. Dave shared the news at Cotting School on Wednesday, January 13, 2021. A letter from Dave to the Cotting School community was shared with the greater community. Read Dave’s full letter to the Cotting community, or click here to view his video message.           Trustees of Cotting School Announce  Bridget Irish as 7th President... Read More

Cotting vs. Nobles 2015

Cotting vs. Nobles 2015

Annual "Friendly Games"

Cotting's annual basketball games against the Junior Varsity "Nobles" team were held on Friday night in the Noble & Greenough gym in Dedham. Begun several years ago by the family of a Cotting alumna, this much anticipated event draws Nobles and Cotting students, parents, faculty, staff, alumni and parents, who cheered players to victory.

Taking on Job One

Taking on Job One

Cotting School program helps young people with physical challenges learn work skills and prepare for life outside the comfort of home. Like many high school students, Matthew Lagunowich follows the Red Sox, loves horror movies, and got decked out for his prom. What sets this 18-year-old Acton resident apart from other youths is that he has cerebral palsy, a condition usually caused by factors that disrupt normal development of the brain before birth, permanently affecting body movement and muscle coordination.

Gift of giving: Students have it all wrapped up

Gift of giving: Students have it all wrapped up

For more than 10 years, teacher Cathy Mayo has guided her students in a holiday project to make and sell wrapping paper and then donate the proceeds to Globe Santa and other charities that benefit children. What makes Mayo's story a little different is that students at the Cotting School in Lexington have a broad spectrum of mild to severe communications and learning disabilities, physical challenges, and complex medical conditions. But their differences don't hold them back from helping other children.